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Seated Figure against a Yellow Background

Auguste Rodin (París, 1840 – Meudon, França, 1917)
Seated Figure against a Yellow Background
1896-1899
Graphite pencil and watercolour on paper laid on cardboard

Auguste Rodin (París, 1840 – Meudon, França, 1917)

Seated Figure against a Yellow Background

1896-1899

Graphite pencil and watercolour on paper laid on cardboard

In the sculptor Auguste Rodin’s drawings, it is important to note the lightness of his brushstrokes, always very easily remedied. The use of watercolor, in a very subtle way, is found modulated in the hair, while in the body it becomes a flat dye.

The sculptor’s biographers point out that the author avoided using professional models and always selected women with no experience in these subjects, like acrobats or artists. In studies like this one, Rodin always completely eradicated the formal pose, opting to capture a moment of privacy and withdrawal or a totally innovative perspective of the female body, as in the case of the artist’s second watercolor that we can see below, where the figure, in addition to being represented from behind and from a lower perspective, expresses movement.

These distinguishing features in the sculptor’s drawings caused them to be labelled revolutionary and, in some cases, because of his stark treatment of the female body, even obscene.

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