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Museum of the Mediterranean

History of the territory

The Mediterranean became the Mare Nostrum  and all the peoples who live around it share the same cultural legacy

The Mediterranean became the Mare Nostrum  and all the peoples who live around it share the same cultural legacy

And little by little we begin to hear how human sounds combine with those of nature as we enter the historical section of the exhibition. Our voices, our bodies and the everyday use of various materials allow us to communicate with each other. The percussive sound of stones, fire, songs, etc. denote the incorporation of culture into an environment where only natural sounds existed previously.

In this section we shall discover the history of this territory, we shall see the first findings from the prehistoric era on the Cua del Duc site and what the first Neolithic huts of Fonollera were like. We shall contemplate some of the Roman pieces from the Camp de la Gruta and hear the stories about how Jews, Muslims and Christians in Torroella lived together in medieval times.

The highlight of this section is the ‘Children of the same sea’ module, where we learn that the men and women of today are the result of continuous cultural exchanges. Today, words in Catalan such as moneda (coin, from the Phoenicians), democràcia (democracy, from the Greeks), urbanisme (urbanism, from the Romans) and bruíxola (compass, from the Arabs) are so common that it is hard to believe that they are the sum of a variety of cultures. Cultural diversity is wealth and we must be open to dialogue with the unknown.

OBJECTS

Children of the same sea
Children of the same sea
Children of the same sea
<p>"Pic del Montgr&iacute;" stone.</p>
"Pic del Montgrí" stone
"Pic del Montgrí" stone
<p>Terra sigillita ceramic piece with the image of a woman playing the lyre</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
Lyre ceramic piece
Lyre ceramic piece
<p>Montgr&iacute; Castle capital.</p>
Montgrí Castle capital
Montgrí Castle capital
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