Museum search

Ter Museum

Industrial society. 1845-1935

<p>The scenery of the industrialisation of the Ter River is reflected in two spectacular scale models</p>

The scenery of the industrialisation of the Ter River is reflected in two spectacular scale models

The mechanisation and industrialisation process implied not only an economic and productive transformation but was also accompanied by profound social and cultural changes. This section uses entertaining audiovisuals, scale models, scenery and other resources to show how these changes shaped our contemporary society. New players appeared: manufacturers and workers, especially women, who were the main workforce in the textile factories on the Ter. New forms of daily life linked to factory work arose, where working hours were gruelling. Awareness of the new social groups and organizational strategies surged in unions, cooperatives, mutual societies, choral societies, employers' organizations, etc. In the new relations between workers and industrialists, conflict (strikes, lock-outs, etc.) was inevitable and came in various forms over the years, often with the onset of violence.

Finally, this new stage cannot be understood without the interest in culture, education, leisure and sport, which is reflected in an intense association movement which paints the picture of a very dynamic society beyond the harshness of the living conditions and the underlying conflict.

scroll to top icon