Museum search

Barcelona Music Museum

Music as a universal phenomenon

<p>The forest of instruments explains these common elements of music. &copy;&nbsp;Music Museum. Photo: Rafael Vargas</p>

The forest of instruments explains these common elements of music. © Music Museum. Photo: Rafael Vargas

Music is a form of communication that is found in all cultures. It is a language of sounds, linked to speech, which evokes its own concepts and images. Music is produced in time and space and is made up of elements  thanks to which we may understand and enjoy it. Sound, time and space. The first element through which we may recognise musical sound is rhythm, which is the ordered sequence of sound and silence over time. Sound modulation. The second element of recognition is the alternation between high and low pitches. Melody emerges from the combination between these different sounds and rhythm. Sound colour, or timbre. This is the third recognisable element of musical sound. The sounds of voices and instruments are made up of proportional blends of partial sounds which enable us to identify their origins. Music arises as a need for expression in particular situations or to transmit emotions, feelings and to inspire human and divine beings to action and, in some cultures, to influence animals or natural phenomena. At the end of this section, the audio-visual projection‘“The shared origins of our music’ marks the beginning of the historical itinerary through the Museum.

OBJECTS

<p>Balafon (Equatorial Guinea), 1850-1900. &copy;&nbsp;Music Museum. Photo: Gabriel Serra</p>
Balafon from Equatorial Guinea
Balafon from Equatorial Guinea
<p>One of the lutes (rear view) was built by Max Unverdorben in Venice, while the other (front view) was made by Hans Hovb Muler. &copy;&nbsp;Music Museum. Photo: Rafael Vargas</p>
Renaissance lutes
Renaissance lutes
<p>The rubab and gralla are two surviving medieval instruments still played today. &copy;&nbsp;Museu de la M&uacute;sica. Photo: Rafael Vargas</p>
Rubab and Gralla
Rubab and Gralla
<p>Christian Rault hurdy gurdy (Le Vanneau, France), 2006. &copy;&nbsp;Museu de la M&uacute;sica. Photo: Rafael Vargas</p>
Hurdy gurdy
Hurdy gurdy
<p>Joan Guillam&iacute; Violoncello (Barcelona, 1756). &copy;&nbsp;Museu de la M&uacute;sica. Photo: Rafael Vargas</p>
Guillamí Violoncello, 1756
Guillamí Violoncello, 1756
<p>Zamar (Rif, Morocco), 1900-1950. &copy;&nbsp;Museu de la M&uacute;sica. Photo: Gabriel Serra</p>
Moroccan Zamar
Moroccan Zamar
scroll to top icon