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Anchovy and Salt Museum

Auctioning the fish

<p>Wooden boxes waiting to be filled with fish for auction, placed on a rack to be transported.</p>

Wooden boxes waiting to be filled with fish for auction, placed on a rack to be transported.

Once it arrived to shore, the fish was auctioned off. The auction was attended by salters and other buyers. The auctioneer would begin to shout out numbers, starting with the highest price: 25, 24, 23... until the first buyer shouted "Me!", which stopped the auctioneer as it meant there was an interested buyer. Once sold, the fish was taken to the saltworks to be preserved in salt, or went to other markets, such the ones in Barcelona.

During the time when sardinal fishing boats were used, the fish were counted in "Qüerns", groups of five, and then placed in baskets. Every basket was counted. Fishmongers also filled up their baskets to sell fish in the "Placeta del Peix" (Fish Square). When teranyina fishing boats were used, the boxes of fish were placed directly on the floor and auctioned off from there. Today, the fish is sold at Port de la Clota, where the auction process has been computerised.

OBJECTS

<p>Rack used to carry and sell fish, made with olive wood made of wicker mesh, from the early 20th century.</p>
Rack
Rack
<p>Photo of a fish auction at the old port in L'Escala during the mid 20th century, by Joan Lass&uacute;s.</p>
Fish auction
Fish auction
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